Biggest Expat Fears And How To Overcome Them

 

Everyone has a dream country they wish they could move to, and many individuals are working to achieve that dream. However, moving to another country comes with a plethora of tasks and difficulties one will have to face. There is a lot to learn and to adapt to as an expat. Let’s discuss some of the biggest expat fears and how they can be overcome.

 

 

 

Overthinking

Plunging yourself into the unknown is always scary. However, many of our fears come from us overthinking. The constant worry that the worst might happen and that you might have missed something will eat at you. Therefore, clear your thoughts and rationalize. Which are the things you can control, and which are the ones you can’t? And, if you can handle it, what is the best way to do it?

For example, if you are worried about breaking some foreign law, then what you can do is research the laws of that country beforehand. If you are concerned about getting lost in a foreign city, then you can study the map of the city. Google has excellent maps with images that can acquaint you with your destination without you having to be there. Finding practical solutions to your problems and avoiding overthinking is the top advice on this list.

 

Language barriers

Language can pose a major barrier depending on where you are traveling around the world. Many people worldwide now speak English, allowing for easy communication wherever you are. However, not every country is like that. This can be very daunting for someone who doesn’t speak the native language of that country.

The most practical solution to this issue is grabbing a tourist’s dictionary with the most helpful stock phrases. Knowing how to introduce yourself and ask fundamental questions about directions, locations, food, etc., will significantly help. Do not worry about mastering the foreign language. As you spend your time as an expat, you will naturally pick up that country’s language over time. You need a bit of a head start, hence why learning a few basic phrases is recommended.

 

Cultural and lifestyle differences

This is another of the biggest expat fears that one has to overcome when moving abroad. For example, the American lifestyle can be much faster and more urban than what you are used to in your native country. Adapting to this change can be confusing and daunting at first.

One of the reasons you might feel pressured to adapt at a rapid pace is so that you don’t stand out as a foreigner. However, you should be doing the opposite. Take your time and adapt at your pace. Explore the country’s culture at your own pace and enjoy the learning process. It takes years to fully adapt to a culture, so don’t put pressure on yourself by expecting to do it within the first two months.

 

Living on your own in a foreign country

The experts at Movers Not Shakers who work with foreign movers claim that this is among the biggest expat fears they hear from their clients, especially from those who came as students. Students are generally young adults with little to no experience living independently. In addition to going to a completely unknown country, this is a major step in a young adult’s life.

However, while it can be challenging to adapt to this change, know that it is not a permanent issue. Every person that is moving to a new place, whether a different city or a country, will feel this unease. It will take you a couple of months to get your bearings in a foreign country. After that, you will start feeling more comfortable with your surroundings and feel right at home. Give yourself time to acquaint yourself with your new location.

 

Financial problems

Financial stability in a foreign country can be challenging to achieve. This is especially the case if you are moving to a country with much higher living standards than your native country’s. Make sure you extensively research the country’s living costs before moving. Please make a list of all the basic things that you will need and write down their prices. For example, write the cost of food, transportation tickets, rent, coffee, etc. Involve the leisure costs as well, such as gym membership costs.

Once you have it all written on a list, you can estimate how much money you will need every month. In addition, the list will help you see what you can do if you need to save cash.

Now comes the question of money itself. Make sure you have a high enough budget to live off of for at least 3 months in advance. That will give you more time to adapt to your new place and find a job. If you are a student, check for any scholarships your university might be offering. Scholarships are extremely welcome to any student since academic life already takes away most of your free time. Juggling a job and education on top of living abroad can be very straining.

 

Final thoughts

Financial stability in a foreign country can be difficult to achieve. This is especially the case if you are moving to a country whose living standards are much higher than your native country’s. Make sure you do extensive research on the living costs of the country before your move. Make a list of all the basic things that you will need and write down their prices. For example, write the cost of food, transportation tickets, rent, coffee, etc. Involve the leisure costs as well, such as gym membership costs.

Once you have it all written on a list, you can have an estimate of how much money you will need every month. In addition, the list will help you see what you can manage to be without if you need to save some money.

Now comes the question of money itself. Make sure you have a high enough budget to live off of for at least 3 months in advance. That will give you more time to adapt to your new place and find a job. If you are a student, make sure to check for any scholarships that your university might be giving. Scholarships are extremely welcome to any student since academic life already takes away most of your free time. Juggling a job and education on top of living abroad can be very straining!